Saturday, April 27, 2013

Owl Woods • April 16


Northern Saw-whet Owl. Most of today's owls were alert due to the continuing high level of human pressure in the Woods. This pressure is due, in part, to the increased activity at the hawk banding station, which is also in Owl Woods. This is what happens at the peak of raptor migration season, for better or for worse.

As with all the long shots, the owl is directly in the middle, whether you can see it or not!

Video at http://youtu.be/HrlzAB1cBUk .

Northern Saw-whet Owl. This owl was *very* distressed and tracked everyone as they glided by the tree. In the video, the owl appears to be panting.

This is the long range shot for the previous owl.

Video at http://youtu.be/tPEFrlp8rjo .

Northern Saw-whet Owl. Though it seems more relaxed than the others, this owl's eyes are open a tad.

This is the long range shot for the previous owl.

Video at http://youtu.be/rDRQP7TVNzc .

Northern Saw-whet Owl. This owl was very well hidden and, clearly, very alert. I chose this artsy shot rather than working for a less obscured vantage point and distressing the owl even more.

The trees near the banding station seem to be favored this season. Unfortunately, this is probably a highly trafficked area due to the banding station proximity.

Video at http://youtu.be/ubxz9TiMYwk .

Long-eared Owl. The noon hour Long-eared Owls continue to be relatively docile and easier to approach and photograph than in the mornings.

Approach is a relative term, of course. These Long-ears are still usually 25 to 30 feet up in the area!

Video of the Long-eared Owl at http://youtu.be/Ba2Nac-uzPU .